LEXI Hand Sanitizer

NON-ALCOHOLIC QUATERNARY AMMONIUM CHLORIDE SANITIZER

QUATS are more effective than alcohol-based sanitizers in the removal of bacteria with a demonstrated “Persistent Kill Rate”. The term, “Persistent Kill Rate” refers to the length of time a product is considered effective, or, how long it continues to kill bacteria on the area of application.

QUATS formulations demonstrate superior stability, lesser toxicity, no odor and are fully compatible with cleaner/detergent formulations.

The formulations used to manufacture the LEXI Sanitization Product Line have been used for many decades in industrial scaled meat and poultry processing plants, dairy processing plants. bakery plants, slaughterhouses, vegetable processing plants and many other food processing facilities. The individual components of the formulations, each have FDA approval to come in contact with food and are extensively used in the healthcare industry under several different brands, including the Clorox Healthcare Product Line, 3M QUAT Disinfectants, Triad III QUAT Disinfectants, Ecolab Products, QUAT 256, Virex II 256 sanitizer Solutions, and many others.

Active Ingredient

QUATERNARY AMMONIUM
COMPOUNDS (QUATS) E.P.A.
REG. NO. 10324-81-110
AND 10324-52 AND FDA CODE
172.165

Disinfectant products utilizing quaternary ammonium compounds (“QUATS”) as the active ingredient are among the most extensively used in Health Care.

Product Safety

  1. While the chemistry of both Purell® and LEXI® are similar, LEXI differs from Purell because LEXI, as a non-alcoholic sanitizer, fundamentally provides longer-lasting superior coverage and protection.
  2. Purell contains 70% ethyl alcohol and is defined as a CLASS I FIRE RISK, while LEXI contains 0.0% alcohol.
  3. Prolonged use of Purell will damage skin causing chafing and leave the skin vulnerable to invading germs and viruses.
  4. Alcohol-based sanitizers like Purell not only damage skin through chafing they are, for the most part, ineffective against norovirus.

A: QUATS are more effective than alcohol-based sanitizers in the removal of bacteria with a demonstrated “Persistent Kill Rate”. The term, “Persistent Kill Rate” refers to the length of time a product is considered effective, or, how long it continues to kill bacteria on the area of application.

QUATS formulations demonstrate superior stability, lesser toxicity, no odor and are fully compatible with cleaner/detergent formulations.

A: Top of the list, is a Class I Fire Rating. Typically, ABHS are approximately 70% to 85% alcohol by volume and are extremely flammable with a “flashpoint” of less than 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Secondly, there are documented cases where ABHS ingestion by (i) children in daycare; and (ii) patients in care facilities; has led to alcohol poisoning and the removal of ABHS from such facilities.

Putting this in perspective, US Poison Control Centers fielded nearly 85,000 calls between 2011and 2015 for alcohol-based hand sanitizer exposure among children.

A: Healthcare workers and consumers have a tendency to shortcut use protocols when faced with an ABHS product that, with persistent use, dries out, chafes and destroys skin leaving it vulnerable to contamination by bacteria and viruses.

A: Shorter than you think:
“Unlike non-alcoholic QUATS, Alcohol-based sanitizers last only a minute or two and must be reapplied when recontamination occurs,” says Dr. Philip Tierno Jr., PhD, Director of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology at NYU Langone Medical Center.